Iran and the US Clash Over Fine Print

After reaching a nuclear agreement, Iran and the US clash over details of the accord.

Iran and the P5+1 announced a framework agreement for Tehran’s nuclear program on April 2. Ever since, however, there have been heated discussions about the details of the accord.

US President Barack Obama called the move a “historic understanding” and “a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see whether or not we can at least take the nuclear issue off the table.”

In a joint statement, EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Federica Mogherini and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said that “solutions on key parameters of a Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action” were reached, and they presented some of the broad aspects of the accord.

But debates have ensued about what was actually agreed to. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Iranian supreme leader, has accused the US of publishing a factsheet that distorts the agreement.

What is behind the debate about the different factsheets? Ariane Tabatabai, a columnist at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, explains in this video.

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Fair Observer’s editorial policy.

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