Our Personal Styles of Information Gathering

Sep 20, 2019

There are two kinds of people — and not just people. Rather, I should say, there are two kinds of sensory styles. This applies to animals, even to Roombas. Knowing those styles helps fix some common arguments. Think of sensory processing in general — the making sense of the world we...

Is Technology Neutral?
Sep 06, 2019

Is Technology Neutral?

Why Addressing Social Factors Could Improve US Health Care
Aug 31, 2019

Why Addressing Social Factors Could Improve US Health Care

10 Physics Tricks to Recover From Digital Decalibration
Aug 23, 2019

10 Physics Tricks to Recover From Digital Decalibration

South Asians Are Shaping the Future of Science and Technology

South Asians Are Shaping the Future of Science and Technology

Aug 17, 2019

Each year, the MIT Technology Review publishes a list of outstanding innovators under 35. They come from fields as diverse as biotechnology, robotics, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, energy, the web, transportation, communications, materials and computer hardware. Their innovations are...

The Physics and Biophysics of Sound “Healing”

The Physics and Biophysics of Sound “Healing”

Aug 09, 2019

The fashionable intelligence at The New York Times has declared sound baths are everywhere, and it’s true. Well-educated people like myself now routinely spend a couple dozen dollars for a few hours in a quiet room listening to ringing gongs, thrumming bowls and shaking rattles....

10 Physics Reasons Why Screens Are Bad for Humans

10 Physics Reasons Why Screens Are Bad for Humans

Jul 26, 2019

Here are 10 interlocking reasons why using screens damages the human nervous system. The reasons are derived from basic mathematical principles of how matter and energy move in space and time. The gist is that the human nervous system, seen as a sensitive instrument, needs to calibrate itself using...

Learning from a Nobel Prize Laureate

Learning from a Nobel Prize Laureate

May 01, 2019

In this edition of The Interview, Fair Observer talks to Joachim Frank, the 2017 Nobel Prize laureate in chemistry. The Nobel Prize, the most prestigious in life sciences, is awarded annually to individuals who have made the most notable contributions to the fields of chemistry, physics,...

Croatia Values Science and Education

Croatia Values Science and Education

Feb 26, 2019

In this edition of The Interview, Fair Observer talks to Dragan Primorac, the former Croatian minister of science, education and sports. Croatia, the newest member of the European Union, has made enormous investments in science and academic research. In doing so, it has secured its place among...

In Conversation with Nobel Laureate Frances Arnold

In Conversation with Nobel Laureate Frances Arnold

Nov 26, 2018

In this edition of The Interview, Fair Observer talks to Frances Arnold, the 2018 Nobel Prize laureate in chemistry. The Nobel Prize is arguably the most prestigious award a scientist can win. Established in memory of the late Swedish chemist, engineer and philanthropist Alfred Nobel in 1895,...

Smoking Isn’t Just Bad for You — It’s Devastating the Environment

Smoking Isn’t Just Bad for You — It’s Devastating the Environment

Oct 30, 2018

The tobacco industry’s carbon footprint is greater than that of entire countries, such as Israel or Peru. Tobacco’s disastrous effects on human health have been clear for decades, despite industry giants trying to hide the evidence linking cigarette smoke and disease for as long as...

Belonging to the Universe: Fritjof Capra in Conversation

Belonging to the Universe: Fritjof Capra in Conversation

Apr 15, 2018

In this guest edition of The Interview, Vikram Zutshi talks to physicist, activist and author Fritjof Capra. Fritjof Capra is an Austrian-born American physicist, systems theorist and deep ecologist. He has written many popular books that connect conceptual changes in science with broader...

Stephen Hawking: An Astonishing Triumph Over Adversity

Stephen Hawking: An Astonishing Triumph Over Adversity

Mar 14, 2018

Martin Rees looks back on a colleague’s spectacular success against all odds. Soon after I enrolled as a graduate student at Cambridge University in 1964, I encountered a fellow student, two years ahead of me in his studies, who was unsteady on his feet and spoke with great difficulty. This...

Antibiotics Are Becoming Less Effective Due to Excessive Use

Antibiotics Are Becoming Less Effective Due to Excessive Use

Feb 23, 2018

In his 1945 Nobel lecture, Alexander Fleming predicted that the improper use of antibiotics would cause future clinical failures. Penicillin, discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928, became known as the “miracle drug” for its instrumental role in the Second World War, when the Allied forces...

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