7/7 London Bombings: Healing and Trauma 10 Years On

The memories of the London bombings are still overwhelming, not just for survivors and victims’ families, but also the first responders.

On July 7, 2005, four explosions ripped through London. Four suicide bombers targeted busy public transportation routes during the morning rush hour, carrying out terrorist attacks on three underground trains and a double-decker bus.

Overall, 52 people lost their lives: 26 on the Piccadilly Line between Russell Square and King’s Cross; 13 on the number 30 bus at Tavistock Place; 7 on the Circle Line train at Aldgate; and 6 at Edgware Road. Some 770 were injured.

This was Britain’s biggest peacetime atrocity, perpetrated by three British-born men and one recent convert to Islam—the youngest just 18 years old.

Then-Mayor of London Ken Livingstone declared that these murders had failed in their chief goal: to turn Londoners against each other, like animals in a cage. A decade later, his speech still carries a powerful message.

Ten years after the tragedy, London commemorates the victims and their families and pays tribute to the tolerance, resilience and hopefulness of the survivors, who remember the day in this powerful video by Channel 4 News.

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Fair Observer’s editorial policy.

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