Jonathan AC Brown

Jonathan AC Brown is Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Muslim-Christian Understanding, and Associate Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding. Brown received his BA in History from Georgetown University in 2000 and his doctorate in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago in 2006. He has studied and conducted research in Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Indonesia, India and Iran, and he is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. His book publications include The Canonization of al-Bukhari and Muslim: The Formation and Function of the Sunni Hadith Canon (Brill, 2007), Hadith: Muhammad’s Legacy in the Medieval and Modern World (Oneworld, 2009), Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2011) and Misquoting Muhammad: The Challenges and Choices of Interpreting the Prophet's Legacy (Oneworld, 2014 in press). He has published articles in the fields of Hadith, Islamic law, Sufism, Arabic lexical theory and pre-Islamic poetry and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Islamic Law. Brown’s current research focuses on modern conflicts between Late Sunni Traditionalism and Salafism in Islamic thought.

The Rise and Fall of the Salafi al-Nour Party in Egypt (Part 2/2)

Dec 29, 2013

Al-Nour was providing an Islamist fig leaf for an adulatory, ultra-nationalist and oppressive military regime. Read part one here. In January, al-Nour Party elected a new head, Younis Makhyoun. Tensions between al-Nour and the Brotherhood broke to the surface when Khaled Alam Eddin, a senior al-Nour member who had been chosen...

The Rise and Fall of the Salafi al-Nour Party in Egypt (Part 1/2)

Dec 14, 2013

Al-Nour was providing an Islamist fig leaf for an adulatory, ultra-nationalist and oppressive military regime. When Mohamed Salmawi, the spokesman for the committee appointed to draft Egypt’s post-coup constitution, appeared before the press on October 29, the message was clear. There would be no place for Article 219 in the new...