Richard Herring

Co-Director of The Wharton Financial Institutions Center and Jacob Safra Professor of International Banking and Professor of Finance, Richard Herring is quite simply extraordinary. He is the author of more than 100 articles, monographs, and books on various topics in financial regulation and international finance. He has served as Director of The Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies, a dual-degree program that combines a Wharton MBA with a Masters in International Studies, as Co-Chair of the U.S. Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee, as Executive Director of the Financial Economists Roundtable, as Vice Dean of the Wharton Undergraduate Division, and as a consultant to the IMF, World Bank, and various U.S. regulatory agencies. Richard is an extraordinary conversationalist and is a favorite of his students, many of whom rate his classes as their finest experience in Wharton. As adviser, Richard helps Fair Observer identify the critical issues of our times and analyze them with nuance and sophistication. _________________________________________________________________________ Our advisors help us to stay true to our mission by suggesting key global issues for analysis, giving feedback and sharing their thoughts with us. They are involved in strategic advice and in formulating our vision but have no role in the day to day running of Fair Observer and hold no responsibilities. Therefore, our advisors hold no legal liability whatsoever for Fair Observer. http://www.wharton.upenn.edu/faculty/herring.cfm

Stress Testing the Fed

July 22, 2011

The Federal Reserve has recently announced its intention to purchase an additional $600 billion of securities as part of a second round of quantitative easing. In the past the Fed typically held its portfolio of short-term Treasuries at book value until they matured. Today, its assets may need to be...

Statement of the Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee

March 21, 2011

The Federal Reserve has recently announced its intention to purchase an additional $600 billion of securities as part of a second round of quantitative easing. In the past the Fed typically held its portfolio of short-term Treasuries at book value until they matured. Today, its assets may need to be...